It’s Toronto's first annual Feral Cat Awareness Week. And here at OMD, we’re not just all about dogs. The fact is, feral cats are a manmade problem, so it’s up to us to fix it. One cat at a time. Yes, it's a daunting task, but if everyone does their part, we can make a huge impact. In the alley behind my house there was once a large colony of cats. With the help of Project Pet Rescue, Queen West Animal Hospital, Dundas West Animal Hospital, Annex Cat Rescue, Urban Cat Relief and The Toronto Humane Society, we’ve been able to get the population under control. All of the kittens have entered adoption programs. The adult cats were trapped with live traps and drop traps, spayed/neutered and either put back or adopted if they were actually friendly. We only have one more adult and two kittens to go.

No, it’s not easy. There’s a lot of work involved, but there are resources. It’s important that once you release the cats, you continue to feed them. Ideally you should have the colony registered with a rescue so that volunteers will add “your” cats to the daily feeding rounds.

Yep, that’s a real thing. Volunteers with designated feeding days, selflessly take time out of their own busy lives to ride around on their bikes and feed feral cats. Imagine that you're a mental health nurse, working 10-hour shifts. After which you need to feed your own cats, spend quality time with them, then walk your dogs, prepare dinner, clean the house and catch up with your spouse. THEN go feed a bunch of feral cats. If that’s not selfless, I don’t know what is. That is a real person I’m describing.

How can you help?  You can learn everything there is to know by taking a workshop with the Toronto Feral Cat Project or Toronto Feral Cat Coalition. These organizations and other rescues are desperate for foster homes and places to recover feral cats while they heal from surgery, before being put back outside. During this 7-10 day period, the cat stays inside of a large crate with food, water and litter. When his/her wound is healed, they go back “home” to where they were living. Every little bit helps, so please do whatever you can. Even if you can’t get involved, there are other ways to help.  Maybe you can build a winter shelter, or donate money, or adopt a cat/kitten.

Here are Pearl, Ryerson and Logan. All rescued from the Queen and Bathurst area, and all waiting for a home. You can apply to adopt them here.3

 

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